Henry Ward Ranger. Tonalist Movement.

Impressed by the Barbizon School landscapes and a Corot he saw in New York, the young artist went to Paris where he was attracted to the works of Millet, Theodore Rousseau, and Adolphe Monticelli; neither the detailed manner of Bastien le Page nor the new Impressionism were of interest to him.

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BROOKLYN BRIDGE, 1899.

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Deeply respectful of the old masters, Ranger improved his technical ability by copying paintings by Constable, Claude, and Hobemma at the Louvre.

He spent several important formulative years in The Netherlands studying with the Hague School masters Joseph Israels, the Maris brothers, and Van Gogh’s uncle, Anton Mauve, all artists that he admired for being “the lineal successors of the Barbizon School.” 

Musée : National Gallery of Art.

BIBLIOGRAPHY
1924
Earle, Helen. Biographical Sketches of American Artists. Lansing, Michigan, 1924: 261.
1943
Paintings from the Chester Dale Collection. Philadelphia, 1943:, unpaginated, repro.
1965
Paintings other than French in the Chester Dale Collection. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1965: 45, repro.
1970
American Paintings and Sculpture: An Illustrated Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1970: 92, repro.
1980
American Paintings: An Illustrated Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1980: 215, repro.
1992
American Paintings: An Illustrated Catalogue. National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1992: 270, repro.
1998
Torchia, Robert Wilson, with Deborah Chotner and Ellen G. Miles. American Paintings of the Nineteenth Century, Part II. The Collections of the National Gallery of Art Systematic Catalogue. Washington, D.C., 1998: 87-89, color repro.

 

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